Texas Sun Yard in Burning Tree 2610 Short Branch cul-de-sac 78247 This yard is on the opposite corner of the two shade yards. The plan was to leave a small portion of the grass that was doing well, and work out from there. The rest of the lawn was replaced by subtle mulched berms to create a rolling effect. Crushed granite pathways, river rock and boulder accents accentuate the theme, along with rustic yard art. Plants are primarily succulents and cactus.
Texas sun yard in Burning Tree. This yard is on the opposite corner of the two shade yards. The plan was to leave a small portion of the grass that was doing well, and work out from there. The rest of the lawn was replaced by subtle mulched berms to create a rolling effect. Crushed granite pathways, river rock and boulder accents accentuate the theme, along with rustic yard art. Plants are primarily succulents and cactus. Photo courtesy of SAWS.
Mark Peterson is the conservation project coordinator for San Antonio Water System.

This Saturday, Oct. 5, nine unique, water-savvy landscapes will be showcased from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. for the annual WaterSaver Landscape Tour. It’s self-guided and best of all: Free.

Every year the tour focuses on urban and suburban landscapes designed for low maintenance and low water use. Some of the features they share include: drip irrigation, native plants, colorful drought-tough perennials and little-to-no lawn space. Most importantly, each landscape offers simple ideas that can be incorporated into any South Texas yard.

Texas Sun Yard in Burning Tree 2610 Short Branch cul-de-sac 78247  This yard is on the opposite corner of the two shade yards. The plan was to leave a small portion of the grass that was doing well, and work out from there. The rest of the lawn was replaced by subtle mulched berms to create a rolling effect. Crushed granite pathways, river rock and boulder accents accentuate the theme, along with rustic yard art. Plants are primarily succulents and cactus.
This Texas sun yard in Burning Tree is on this year’s tour. This yard is on the opposite corner of the two shade yards. The plan was to leave a small portion of the grass that was doing well, and work out from there. The rest of the lawn was replaced by subtle mulched berms to create a rolling effect. Crushed granite pathways, river rock and boulder accents accentuate the theme, along with rustic yard art. Plants are primarily succulents and cactus. Photo courtesy of SAWS.

Some of the more interesting features this year include:

  • Neighbors working together to create sweeping landscapes that benefit both yards.
  • Plant combinations that flow seamlessly from sunny areas to shady areas.
  • Mash-ups of whimsical art and drought-tolerant plants.
  • Some of the features they share include: drip irrigation, native plants, colorful drought-tough perennials and little-to-no lawn space.

At each stop, the Gardening Volunteers of South Texas will serve as tour guides.

The landscapes were selected through a nomination process in late summer. The tour is sponsored by San Antonio Water System, San Antonio River Authority and the Gardening Volunteers of South Texas.

What do you look forward to seeing during the tour? Share it with us on Facebook and join the Join the MySAWS Conversation.

Mark Peterson is the conservation project coordinator for San Antonio Water System.

This mosaic garden in Oak Hollow across from McAllister Park is featured on this year's tour. The front yard may be described as ‘Puro San Antonio.’ Pathways of stone and mosaic tiles, installed by the homeowner and her daughter, wind their way through a mosaic garden of colorful succulents and other drought hardy and theme-appropriate plants. Mature mesquite trees add shape and interest. Wonderful collection of yard art, containers and collectables fill this yard with creative ideas to take home. The back yard is a colorful, shady retreat.
This mosaic garden in Oak Hollow across from McAllister Park is featured on this year’s tour. The front yard may be described as ‘Puro San Antonio.’ Pathways of stone and mosaic tiles, installed by the homeowner and her daughter, wind their way through a mosaic garden of colorful succulents and other drought hardy and theme-appropriate plants. Mature mesquite trees add shape and interest. Wonderful collection of yard art, containers and collectables fill this yard with creative ideas to take home. The back yard is a colorful, shady retreat.

This article has been re-published with permission from the SAWS WaterSaver Newsletter.

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