Frank is located at 1150 S. Alamo St, a former Alamo Methodist Church. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
Frank is located at 1150 S. Alamo St, a former Alamo Methodist Church. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

More than a year has passed since Daniel Northcutt, co-owner of Austin-based gourmet hot dog joint Frank, announced the restaurant was opening its second location on the corner of South Alamo and Wickes Street.  After months of unexpected “curveballs” thrown at Northcutt and Frank co-owner Geoff Peveto, the restaurant is finally ready for business.

The restaurant will launch its official grand opening on Friday, but Frank has already welcomed a number of people on the prowl for good food and cold beer during its soft opening this week.

“On Sunday at 5 p.m. we unlocked the doors and stepped back and just let the folks roll in,” Northcutt said.

With menu items like bratwursts and craft beer, the restaurant is sure to find success in the historically-German King William neighborhood. Passersby are tempted with savory scents of ingredients and toppings like onion and garlic, and of course the artisanal sausage on the grill.

Frank offers more than just local brews, craft cocktails, salads, and exotic hot dogs made with pork, duck, and even kangaroo among the more traditional options. The venue, which is located at 1150 S. Alamo St., will also feature live music and entertainment, bringing the experience full-circle in a neighborhood that draws visitors looking to unwind after a long day.

No, there aren’t any live shows booked yet, but Northcutt said to stay tuned.

“Quality over quantity,” he said. “Our focus right now is food and beverage.”

Employees wait for the rush of people to come at 5pm for the soft opening. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
Employees wait for the rush of people to come at 5pm for the soft opening. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

Frank also roasts, grinds, and brews fresh coffee on a made-to-order basis, and offers a brunch menu.

For the full menu, click here.

Since Frank opened its doors in Austin in 2009, its relaxed atmosphere and elaborate twists on a traditional culinary classic have made it a popular destination for residents and visitors. With the restaurant’s expansion to San Antonio, Northcutt and his family moved to the city a year ago so he can remain active in the restaurant’s future in the King William neighborhood.

“We want to add to the neighborhood while coexisting … there are so many great things going on (in San Antonio) and we feel like we’ve got something to contribute. We want to jump in and play,” he said in a 2014 Rivard Report interview when he initially announced the restaurant’s San Antonio venture.

Sara Lauren Hinojosa and Erin Chase wait on the front steps after learning that Frank won't open until 5pm this evening. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
Sara Lauren Hinojosa and Erin Chase wait on the front steps after learning that Frank won’t open until 5 p.m. this evening. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

Northcutt and the Frank team have already felt welcomed in the area.

“We’ve had some good first steps into the neighborhood and we’ve been meeting lots of amazing folks which has solidified the reason I wanted to move down here,” he said of the restaurant’s first few days in business.

The building, formerly Alamo Methodist Church, has not been a church since 1968, but has served as a home to restaurants and theater. Most recently it was San Antone Cafe and Concerts, a live music venue with Texas-style comfort food, which closed in 2011 after its then-owners encountered medical issues. After sitting dormant for a few years, it was Northcutt who decided to breathe life back into the more than 100-year-old building.

His admiration for the structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, motivated him to preserve its historical qualities as best as possible.

“That building is in phenomenal condition and we will respect the historical character,” he said during a previous interview. “We’re not doing anything invasive at all.”

There are “a few things coming up the pipeline to talk about” regarding the restaurant’s future in San Antonio, Northcutt said, but for now the Frank team is going to ease into normalcy in their new Southtown spot.

“We’re just going to make sure we’re dialed in and just take it easy and have fun,” he said.

Considering its proximity to places like the Blue Star Arts Complex, Frank is sure to draw crowds of curious residents and visitors alike who are interested in an affordable, and tasty, meal. Now, with a few blue and red umbrellas and a sleekly-renovated interior, the church-turned hot dog joint is ready to make its debut.

Editor’s note: This story was updated with quotes from an interview with Frank co-owner Daniel Northcutt on Friday, March 4.

https://rivardreport.wildapricot.org

*Top image: Frank is located at 1150 S. Alamo St, the former Alamo Methodist Church. Photo by Kathryn Boyd-Batstone.

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Camille Garcia

Camille Garcia is a journalist born and raised in San Antonio. She formerly worked at the San Antonio Report as assistant editor and reporter. Her email is camillenicgarcia@gmail.com