An attendee reaches for fresh fruit during EcoCentro's "bEARTHday" celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.
An attendee reaches for fresh fruit during EcoCentro's "bEARTHday" celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.

The sky dropped some much-needed water on San Antonio’s Earth Day on Wednesday.

William R. Sinkin EcoCentro Program Coordinator Julie Cornelius said the rain catchment tank, which sits in front of the center’s eco-friendly building on North Main Street, is full of water from the day’s downpour – which will be used to hydrate the various gardens at the center.

EcoCentro, which sits right across the street from San Antonio College, is a sustainability hub for college students and community members alike. The building’s roof is made up of 135 solar panels, its yard hosts a community garden, and its structure serves as a meeting place for various clubs and organizations.

EcoCentro celebrated its first birthday on Wednesday, calling it their “bEARTHday” celebration in honor of Earth Day.

Lisa Cervantes enjoys refreshments during EcoCentro's "bEARTHday" celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.
Lisa Cervantes (left) enjoys refreshments during EcoCentro’s “bEARTHday” celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.

Lisa Cervantes, student president of the Alamo Colleges’ Students for Environmental Awareness club, said the organization sold agua frescas on the San Antonio College’s campus earlier in the day to fundraise for a recycling campaign, while also holding a bike mechanics workshop on campus – all in support of Earth Day.

“We were encouraging students to ride an alternative means of transportation because it’s a much healthier, cleaner, and active way to get around,” she said.

Cervantes said the San Antonio College is on the list to receive a B-Cycle station.

“It’s a great program for people to rent bikes and travel through San Antonio on bikes,” she said. “I’m an avid cyclist so I’m pushing for it. We need more cyclists, bike lanes, and cycle safety.”

Renee Williams smiles for the camera during EcoCentro's "bEARTHday" celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.
Renee Williams smiles for the camera during EcoCentro’s “bEARTHday” celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson.

The club is also raising thousands of worms to help breakdown compost, a process called vermicomposting.

“The worms got me involved,” said club member Renee Williams. “As a child, my father used to raise worms for fishing, and I remember helping him take care of the worms. They like to eat coffee grounds, cornmeal, and eggshells, so I started bringing by food scraps.”

The worms eat the decomposing food scraps, producing castings that are full of beneficial microbes and nutrients, which can be used as a plant fertilizer.

EcoCentro celebrates Earth Day everyday by opening its doors to environmental organizations, operating out of an eco-friendly building, and educating the community for a sustainable future.

The Sinkin EcoCentro building on North Main Avenue. Photo by Joan Vinson.
The Sinkin EcoCentro building on North Main Avenue. Photo by Joan Vinson.

*Featured/top image: An attendee reaches for fresh fruit during EcoCentro’s “bEARTHday” celebration. Photo by Joan Vinson. 

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Joan Vinson

Former Rivard Report Assistant Editor Joan Vinson is a San Antonio native who graduated from The University of Texas with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She's a yoga fanatic and an adventurer at heart....