The downtown fireworks at Hemisfair Park, taken from the Woodlawn Lake Park celebration northeast of downtown. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.
The downtown fireworks at Hemisfair Park, taken from the Woodlawn Lake Park celebration northeast of downtown. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.
Robert Rivard

When bumper-to-bumper traffic flows south out of downtown like the bumper-to-bumper traffic heading north out of downtown, we know something big has been happening. Something big in this case was the Second Annual Fourth of July “Stars and Stripes” fireworks extravaganza at Hemisfair Park.

The event, sponsored by the Greater Chamber of Commerce, came off flawlessly, at least for those of us gazing skyward from outside the Park. Police estimate that a crowd of 275,000 gathered in the Park. If there were any major incidents, we haven’t heard about them.

The downtown fireworks at Hemisfair Park, taken from the Woodlawn Lake Park celebration northeast of downtown. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.
The downtown fireworks at Hemisfair Park, taken from the Woodlawn Lake Park celebration northeast of downtown. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.

Traffic aside, not everyone was able to come downtown, or better yet, watch from back yards, patios, sidewalks, and other urban core spaces. So we offer a few minutes of the show for those who stayed home.

The display lasted 20 minutes. Here is a three-minute version:

Here is the one-minute finale:

Next year, plan to come downtown. Better yet, move on down. If you can see the Tower of Americas from your new home you can see the fireworks.

The fireworks at the Woodlawn Lake Fourth of July celebration. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.
The fireworks at the Woodlawn Lake Fourth of July celebration. Photo by Kevin G. Saunders.

By the way, not every city fared as well with its fireworks shows as San Antonio. Unfortunately, 28 spectators in Simi Valley, California were inured when premature explosions on the ground sent ignited fireworks spraying into the crowd. Illegal fireworks set off in Seattle caused more than $1 million in damage to a boatyard. You can read and watch videos of the Simi Valley disaster and others by clicking on this Atlantic Cities story.

Follow Robert Rivard on Twitter @rivardreport or on Facebook.

Related stories:

Colliding Canoes, a Paddling Congressman, and July 4th Fun

Museums in the Current: Hardberger’s Homage to the San Antonio River

Fourth of July: Firework Shows at Hemisfair Park and Woodlawn Lake

Paddlers Take to the River at Fourth of July King William Yacht Club Regatta

A Cornyation Virgin’s Voyage Through Cringes and Glitter

A Brief Guide to Fiesta for First Timers & The Cascarón App

While Others ‘Fiesta’, San Antonio Cops Keep Things Cool

Robert Rivard

Robert Rivard is co-founder and columnist at the San Antonio Report.